Category Archives: landscape

Garwin Falls in Wilton

Today, we discovered another popular local waterfall that we hadn’t yet visited – Garwin Falls in Wilton. Wow! What a beautiful series of cascades along this short stretch of what used to be the Wilton Reservoir just off the Isaac Frye Highway. For this blog post, I think I’ll simply let the photos do the talking….

First, the location:

Then, the upper (and smaller) portion of the river:

Image of Upper Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The initial stream that feeds into the upper portion of Garwin Falls.
Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The upper portion of Garwin Falls during Autumn.

Following a short little hike down the trail, you come to the lower and significantly larger portion of the falls:

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Purgatory Falls in Lyndeborough, New Hampshire

It’s only recently that I’ve begun my waterfall-hunting excursions around the beautiful state of New Hampshire. The very first falls that I visited (since it’s also the one closest to my home in Goffstown) was the Lower Purgatory Falls – one part of a multi-fall system along the Purgatory River in Lyndeborough and Milford.

The Lower Falls are the largest in the system and are most impressive following the Spring thaw or heavy summer rains. I took the man-cub to visit them in late April when the thaw was in full swing and, I must say, it was well worth the short and easy hike in! The trailhead for the Lower Falls is right off Purgatory Road (see map, below) and the trail is a short and mostly-level path through the woods to the river. Note that, once you reach the falls, you will have to navigate some steep rocky and stumpy terrain if you want to climb down to the actual water.

Image of Lower Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Lower Purgatory Falls during the Spring thaw.
Image of Lower Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
Side view of the Lower Falls.

The falls are fed from the upper portion of the Purgatory River and, once you are finished admiring the Lower Falls, you can hike up above them and follow the river north. During the latter part of Spring, the greens of the new leaves and moss close in tight around the river and make for a very serene, almost fantasy-like landscape….

Image of Purgatory River by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Purgatory River at the height of Spring.
Image of Purgatory River by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Purgatory River at the height of Spring.

The Upper Purgatory Falls are a series of smaller, but no less beautiful, cascades. You can hike to them from the Lower Falls but it is a long hike through the woods so keep that in mind if you are short on time. Alternatively, there is a trailhead for the Upper Falls that you can find using the map embedded above.

Image of Upper Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Upper Purgatory Falls during the earlier part of Spring before the drought.

I highly recommend this hike during the Autumn when the leaves are changing and the landscape is aflame with color. It is peaceful and typically uncrowded and gives you a greater appreciation for the simple beauties of our world.

Image of Upper Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media group.
The Upper Falls ran very dry following the summer 2016 drought.
Image of Purgatory River by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
Leaves falling on the smaller cascades of the Purgatory River during Autumn 2016.
Image of woods by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The sun shines through the trees around the Purgatory River during Autumn 2016.

If you haven’t yet checked out this hidden gem in the woods of Lyndeborough and Milford, New Hampshire, I highly suggest you do so. It is a beautiful landscape during any time of the year!


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Mount Washington Region

July was…hot. And August is shaping up to be no better, so far. With temperatures in the upper 80s to lower 90s each day, folks are looking for any way possible to beat the heat. Today, we hit on a great idea: Why not escape the 90-degree day by enjoying the afternoon at the coldest spot in the Northeast??? Knowing that Mount Washington is universally regarded as having the most unpredictable weather on the planet, we figured it might be a fun trip on this hot and sticky day. So, to the North we drove!

Of course, if you set your GPS for the base of Mount Washington and just drive, you will miss a number of amazing sights and stops along the way. Along the way to the mountain, we made a point to stop at such places as Silver Cascade – a gorgeous waterfall right on the side of the road on Route 302 -, the world-famous Mount Washington Hotel, the Old Man of The Mountain historic viewing site and, of course, The Basin – a beautiful walking trail that leads to a neat geologic formation and waterfall that gives the location its modern name.

Headed North, our first stop was of course at the site of the Old Man. As sad as it is to see the symbol of our state fallen, the memorial plaza and profile viewers are a great way to once again “see” the formation in its original glory.

Image of Old Man of The Mountain by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Old Man of The Mountain is “restored” thanks to the profiler viewing stations installed in the memorial plaza.

Across the way from the Old Man viewing plaza is Eagle Cliff on the western edge of Mount Lafayette. The photo below shows “The Eaglet”, a formation popular with rock climbers. Look closely at this photo and you can see climbers at the summit of the formation.

Image of Eagle Cliff by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Eagle Cliff rock formation known as “The Eaglet”. Note the climbers at the summit.

The main route to Mount Washington is NH302 – a scenic byway with plenty of opportunities for stops along the way for photos and relaxation. The historic Mount Washington Hotel in Crawford Notch is an impressive feat of architecture situated in the hills of Bretton Woods and is worth the stop even if just to gaze on the building and grounds.

Image of Mount Washington Hotel and Resort by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The historic and world-famous Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods.

Further down the road, in Hart’s Location, you come across Silver Cascade – a tall and narrow waterfall that lies right next to the highway.

Image of Silver Cascade by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Silver Cascade waterfall in Hart’s Location.

Of course, the real purpose of our trip was to get to the summit of Mount Washington. And so, after what was already a fun day in the region – despite the heat -, we finally found ourselves on the famous Mount Washington Auto Road. The trip up was filled with the grand scenic views that make the road and the mountain so popular and, before we knew it, we were at the summit pulling into a parking space. Despite the 90-degree heat, it was a brisk 50-degrees at the summit. While we enjoyed the coolness for a few moments, it quickly became obvious that bringing our jackets with us was a good idea! The wind was blowing very strong and the clouds had the summit almost completely blocked in. Nevertheless, there were occasional glimpses of the various mountain ranges that make up the White Mountains region.

Image of Mount Washington summit by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The sign at the summit of Mount Washington – 6,288′ above sea level.
Image of Mount Washington Observatory by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Mount Washington Observatory where the highest wind gust ever recorded by man occurred in 1934 – an incredible 231 miles per hour!
Image of Mount Washington Yankee Building by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Yankee Building at the summit of Mount Washington.
Image of Mount Washington summit buildings by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Sherman Adams Visitor Center is on the left with the Summit Stage Office on the right. Note the chains used to hold down the building in the event of fierce summit winds!
Image of Mount Washington scenic views by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
Even under a cloud cover, the view from the summit is pretty spectacular.
Image of young photographer by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The next generation showing every intention of keeping the family business alive for years to come!

The drive down was fairly quick and, once we reached the base, the summer heat hit us like a furnace. But, the relief of the mountain and all the fun we had along the way made the day thoroughly enjoyable.


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Copyrights – No Big Deal?

One of the biggest problems the advent of technology and the fully-integrated, networked and inter-linked world has created is a tremendous misunderstanding of copyright laws. Through simple “Select All > Copy > Paste” functions, the bodies of work created by one person become the un-paid-for expressions of another. To some, this cavalier use of intellectual property is no big deal. After all, they figure, if you’re putting it out on the web, you must be okay with it being used, right? Wrong.

Photography, especially, has fallen severe victim to this dilemma. Most photographers want to be able to put their work on their online portfolio for all to see without the distraction of watermarks or logos branded into the image. Right-click disabling software is not effective either as those who know how can easily bypass such measures. But it is not the photographs or the method of acquiring them that are the real problem in today’s technologically evolved world – it is the mindset of the general populace that is to blame.

The ease of capturing and re-using digital images or text has fostered a general impression in our society that it’s simply okay to do so. As professional photographers, we have seen this in so many different areas over the years. We have had people see a photo of ours on Facebook that they like and state publicly that they are printing it out and blowing it up for their walls with never a thought of compensation to the owner of the photo (us). We have had commercial clients balk at the “Usage Rights” fee in our commercial contracts because they don’t understand that they are not purchasing a photo – they are purchasing the rights to USE that photo. It becomes difficult sometimes to explain that this is not a new concept. Usage rights have been around since the birth of copyright law.

Perhaps the worst offense we have endured, though, is the taking of photos from our public profiles for use in news publications – either digital or print. You would think that a news organization, in particular, would understand the value of copyright. Surprisingly, some do not. Perhaps the cause of this is the very sneaky brainchild of organizations like CNN who, several years ago, realized they could get their news photography for free by simply offering photo credit to the photographer. Suddenly, every Joe and Jane with a camera who just wanted to see their name in print was offering up all their photos to the news outlets for nothing. As a result, some news organizations now expect you to provide photography for free.

I am aware how much of a rant all of this must sound like. Maybe even a bit whiny. I get it. But, to those of us whose income relies heavily on our craft, it is no small matter. Architects get paid. Caterers get paid. Seamstresses get paid. Photographers have every right to expect the same. So the next time you see something really wonderful and you have the urge to press that right-side mouse button, please stop for a moment and consider what you do for a living…and ask if you would be okay with me copying and using your work for free.

About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his nine-year-old son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Wonderful day for photos and fun!

Sunday was a great day for 603 Media Group. Not great as in “We just won the lottery!” or “We just had a photo on the cover of National Geographic!” No, it was great because it was one of those days when it seems like you are really just living life the way it’s supposed to be lived.

We started off the day with a senior photo shoot in Bellows Falls, Vermont. The subject was a very lovely young lady named Tori and we accompanied her and her wonderful mom, Mary, to the local drinking water reservoir where Tori thought the lake and foliage might make for a nice backdrop for her photos. Boy, was she right! The water was as calm as glass, the colors were just right and she worked with Jesse as if she had a lifetime of professional modeling behind her! After the lake portion of the shoot, we decided to bring Tori and her mom into downtown Bellows Falls for some more “urban” shots (if Bellows Falls could ever be called urban!). The results, as seen below, were just fantastic and we ended the shoot knowing that we had yet another happy client in the books.

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On the way home from Vermont, we decided to stop into Keene, New Hampshire and see what was going on in my old stomping grounds. Turns out, it was the day after the annual Pumpkin Festival and the downtown area was a jumble of people, cars, litter and smashed pumpkins. What fun! (Well, from a photographer’s point of view, anyways!) Despite it being a Sunday, several workers were busy cleaning up the streets to restore the downtown area to the quaint and lovely little town that Keene is known for being.

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When we left Keene, I surprised Jesse by taking her through the village of Roxbury and up onto the top of Otter Brook Dam. The sun was low in the sky and the colors of the leaves were simply beautiful. While I puttered around getting some nice landscape shots, Jesse found a place to rest and take a breather from all the bustle of the day’s activities:

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The combination of the clouds, low sun and Autumn colors made for some perfect shooting and I think I got a keeper or two from the day. What do you think?

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On the way home, as we headed across Route 101 towards Manchester, we rounded the western edge of Dublin Lake and, looking back, realized we had been handed an amazing stroke of luck with the sun literally just about to sink below the hills. I whipped the car into a private beach on the eastern edge of the lake, got out the tripod and barely had time to catch the last rays of the setting sun. Simply amazing luck and an impressive light show from the heavens!!!

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All in all, it was a great day! Did I say that, already? ;o)