Tag Archives: photography

Garwin Falls in Wilton

Today, we discovered another popular local waterfall that we hadn’t yet visited – Garwin Falls in Wilton. Wow! What a beautiful series of cascades along this short stretch of what used to be the Wilton Reservoir just off the Isaac Frye Highway. For this blog post, I think I’ll simply let the photos do the talking….

First, the location:

Then, the upper (and smaller) portion of the river:

Image of Upper Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The initial stream that feeds into the upper portion of Garwin Falls.
Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The upper portion of Garwin Falls during Autumn.

Following a short little hike down the trail, you come to the lower and significantly larger portion of the falls:

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.

Image of Garwin Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Purgatory Falls in Lyndeborough, New Hampshire

It’s only recently that I’ve begun my waterfall-hunting excursions around the beautiful state of New Hampshire. The very first falls that I visited (since it’s also the one closest to my home in Goffstown) was the Lower Purgatory Falls – one part of a multi-fall system along the Purgatory River in Lyndeborough and Milford.

The Lower Falls are the largest in the system and are most impressive following the Spring thaw or heavy summer rains. I took the man-cub to visit them in late April when the thaw was in full swing and, I must say, it was well worth the short and easy hike in! The trailhead for the Lower Falls is right off Purgatory Road (see map, below) and the trail is a short and mostly-level path through the woods to the river. Note that, once you reach the falls, you will have to navigate some steep rocky and stumpy terrain if you want to climb down to the actual water.

Image of Lower Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Lower Purgatory Falls during the Spring thaw.
Image of Lower Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
Side view of the Lower Falls.

The falls are fed from the upper portion of the Purgatory River and, once you are finished admiring the Lower Falls, you can hike up above them and follow the river north. During the latter part of Spring, the greens of the new leaves and moss close in tight around the river and make for a very serene, almost fantasy-like landscape….

Image of Purgatory River by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Purgatory River at the height of Spring.
Image of Purgatory River by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Purgatory River at the height of Spring.

The Upper Purgatory Falls are a series of smaller, but no less beautiful, cascades. You can hike to them from the Lower Falls but it is a long hike through the woods so keep that in mind if you are short on time. Alternatively, there is a trailhead for the Upper Falls that you can find using the map embedded above.

Image of Upper Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Upper Purgatory Falls during the earlier part of Spring before the drought.

I highly recommend this hike during the Autumn when the leaves are changing and the landscape is aflame with color. It is peaceful and typically uncrowded and gives you a greater appreciation for the simple beauties of our world.

Image of Upper Purgatory Falls by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media group.
The Upper Falls ran very dry following the summer 2016 drought.
Image of Purgatory River by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
Leaves falling on the smaller cascades of the Purgatory River during Autumn 2016.
Image of woods by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The sun shines through the trees around the Purgatory River during Autumn 2016.

If you haven’t yet checked out this hidden gem in the woods of Lyndeborough and Milford, New Hampshire, I highly suggest you do so. It is a beautiful landscape during any time of the year!


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Mount Washington Region

July was…hot. And August is shaping up to be no better, so far. With temperatures in the upper 80s to lower 90s each day, folks are looking for any way possible to beat the heat. Today, we hit on a great idea: Why not escape the 90-degree day by enjoying the afternoon at the coldest spot in the Northeast??? Knowing that Mount Washington is universally regarded as having the most unpredictable weather on the planet, we figured it might be a fun trip on this hot and sticky day. So, to the North we drove!

Of course, if you set your GPS for the base of Mount Washington and just drive, you will miss a number of amazing sights and stops along the way. Along the way to the mountain, we made a point to stop at such places as Silver Cascade – a gorgeous waterfall right on the side of the road on Route 302 -, the world-famous Mount Washington Hotel, the Old Man of The Mountain historic viewing site and, of course, The Basin – a beautiful walking trail that leads to a neat geologic formation and waterfall that gives the location its modern name.

Headed North, our first stop was of course at the site of the Old Man. As sad as it is to see the symbol of our state fallen, the memorial plaza and profile viewers are a great way to once again “see” the formation in its original glory.

Image of Old Man of The Mountain by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Old Man of The Mountain is “restored” thanks to the profiler viewing stations installed in the memorial plaza.

Across the way from the Old Man viewing plaza is Eagle Cliff on the western edge of Mount Lafayette. The photo below shows “The Eaglet”, a formation popular with rock climbers. Look closely at this photo and you can see climbers at the summit of the formation.

Image of Eagle Cliff by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Eagle Cliff rock formation known as “The Eaglet”. Note the climbers at the summit.

The main route to Mount Washington is NH302 – a scenic byway with plenty of opportunities for stops along the way for photos and relaxation. The historic Mount Washington Hotel in Crawford Notch is an impressive feat of architecture situated in the hills of Bretton Woods and is worth the stop even if just to gaze on the building and grounds.

Image of Mount Washington Hotel and Resort by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The historic and world-famous Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods.

Further down the road, in Hart’s Location, you come across Silver Cascade – a tall and narrow waterfall that lies right next to the highway.

Image of Silver Cascade by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Silver Cascade waterfall in Hart’s Location.

Of course, the real purpose of our trip was to get to the summit of Mount Washington. And so, after what was already a fun day in the region – despite the heat -, we finally found ourselves on the famous Mount Washington Auto Road. The trip up was filled with the grand scenic views that make the road and the mountain so popular and, before we knew it, we were at the summit pulling into a parking space. Despite the 90-degree heat, it was a brisk 50-degrees at the summit. While we enjoyed the coolness for a few moments, it quickly became obvious that bringing our jackets with us was a good idea! The wind was blowing very strong and the clouds had the summit almost completely blocked in. Nevertheless, there were occasional glimpses of the various mountain ranges that make up the White Mountains region.

Image of Mount Washington summit by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The sign at the summit of Mount Washington – 6,288′ above sea level.
Image of Mount Washington Observatory by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Mount Washington Observatory where the highest wind gust ever recorded by man occurred in 1934 – an incredible 231 miles per hour!
Image of Mount Washington Yankee Building by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Yankee Building at the summit of Mount Washington.
Image of Mount Washington summit buildings by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The Sherman Adams Visitor Center is on the left with the Summit Stage Office on the right. Note the chains used to hold down the building in the event of fierce summit winds!
Image of Mount Washington scenic views by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
Even under a cloud cover, the view from the summit is pretty spectacular.
Image of young photographer by Jeremy Jones for 603 Media Group.
The next generation showing every intention of keeping the family business alive for years to come!

The drive down was fairly quick and, once we reached the base, the summer heat hit us like a furnace. But, the relief of the mountain and all the fun we had along the way made the day thoroughly enjoyable.


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Sports Portraiture

Today, I had the opportunity to do some athlete-themed portrait work in the studio at SOPHA in Manchester. This was a shoot I had been planning in my mind for a while but hadn’t found the right model to work with. Along came Paul. Paul is a personal trainer and all-around great guy and he was a lot of fun to work with under the lights.

For the bulk of the shoot, the vision I had been formulating in my head involved lighting primarily with grids on edge lights. Using a dark backdrop and keeping Paul in a very dark-blue t-shirt for most of the shots, I lit him with a medium octagon fill light on a boom and two 30-inch strips with grids – one on each side. The purpose of this setup was to maintain the overall dark tone of each photo while “cutting” the model out from the background. Without the edge lighting, Paul’s torso and hair would have completely disappeared into the dark background.

We began the session with some nice, static portraits. Again, notice how the edges of Paul’s shirt and his hair cut nicely from the background:

Image of athlete in studio portrait session.

Image of athlete in studio portrait session.

While I was mostly looking for static portraits out of this session, we did play around with some energetic shots, as well. Here, Paul demonstrates pushups using a medicine ball. My arms were shaking just watching him do them!

Image of medicine ball pushups with male model in studio portrait.
Paul demonstrating medicine ball pushups.

For the last shot, I needed to get Paul out of his shirt and into some speed gloves so he could show off his boxing skills. Without the edge lighting, this shot could have failed due to the black glove against a dark background. But notice how the edge lighting cuts the glove from the background and also highlights the yellow logo on the knuckles of the glove.

Image of boxer in studio portrait session.

When all was said and done, my favorite shot of the day ended up being the one at the very top of this post of Paul holding his medicine ball in contemplation. All-in-all, it was a fun session and we were both very pleased with the end results. Looking forward to the next collaboration!


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

It’s Not the Gear, My Dear….

How many times have you been on the receiving end of somebody looking at your setup and saying, “Wow, that camera must take great photos!”? I shoot with the Canon 5D Mark ii and L-series lenses and I’ve heard that darn line more times than I care to recall. So much so, in fact, that I’ve taken to replying with, “I don’t know. Does your oven cook great meals?” Snarky, yes, but it always makes my point.

Image of Snow in Goffstown
The great Turkey Day storm of 2014 as captured using my son’s Nikon Coolpix.

I love my gear. And, yes, I admit I’ve become a bit of a camera snob over the years. I didn’t used to be but, after spending the best years of my life with an incredibly talented photojournalist who shot predominantly with the 16-35mm, my entire approach to framing changed and now I get annoyed whenever I have the perfect subject and don’t have my gear in my hands.

However, in spite of my love and preference for my pro-level gear, I recognize that the equipment I shoot with is only half the battle to getting a great shot. Framing, lighting, tonal range, EMOTION…these are things that even the most expensive gear in the world cannot create for you.

Image of Blossom Hill Cemetery Chapel
The chapel on the grounds of Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire as captured using my son’s Nikon Coolpix.

The few images that I’ve selected for this story were taken with a range of low-budget cameras: a Nikon Coolpix, a Sony Cybershot, and a Blackberry cell phone. Yet, I find them to be very aesthetically pleasing – and so do others, judging by the comments. Now, don’t get me wrong, these will never win awards and they will look awful if blown up to more than about an 8″x10″ print. Such is the nature of a low-quality digital sensor. But, for sharing on social media, for capturing moments in time, or for just conveying an appreciation of a particular scene, they do their job just as well as if they had been captured by my 5D.

Image of Lincoln Monument
The Lincoln Monument in the early morning light as captured by a Sony Cybershot.

The real trick in accomplishing this, of course, is post-processing. Even with today’s best cameras, it is very rare that non-journalist photographers present images for serious consideration without some degree of post-processing. Why should your low-budget images be treated any differently? If you expect to get an emotionally-charged landscape out of your $99 Coolpix, well, you’re going to be left disappointed. If, however, you consider ahead of time how you can capture the scene and manipulate it in post, then you can actually create a very nice end product.

Each of the photos I’ve presented here has been touched up in post with basic tools: contrast adjustments, dodging and burning, noise reduction and color correction. None of them were particularly planned out and were just intended to capture moments in time. But, as you can see, with a little post-processing work, passable photos are the result.

Image of Bellows Falls Reservoir
The monitoring building on the Bellows Falls Reservoir as captured by a Blackberry cell phone camera.

So, here’s a challenge for you: The next time you plan on taking a walkabout, leave your DSLR in the case, grab your point-and-shoot or even just your cell phone and see what you can come up with without the crutch of your expensive gear. Let your mind’s eye do the talking and don’t forget to share the results!


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Photoshoot with Pulse!

We had the pleasure of shooting Connecticut River Valley’s fan-favorite classic rock cover band, Pulse!, last week. The band has teamed up with local classic car club, Car Nutz, to perform at a benefit event this fall. Car Nutz provided the beautiful rigs that were used as backdrops for the photoshoot and club President, Wayne Boardman, graciously allowed us the use of his facilities to work in.

The guys were quite the characters, hamming it up for the lens and barely able to keep a straight face.

Image of classic rock cover band, Pulse!

When it did get time for the serious shots, though, they pulled it together…but only just!

Image of classic rock cover band, Pulse!

All in all, it was a fun shoot with a great group of guys and we look forward to hearing more of their music as they play out more gigs in the region….

Image of classic rock cover band, Pulse!

Image of classic rock cover band, Pulse!

Image of classic rock cover band, Pulse!


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photo Walk – October 11, 2014

MANCHESTER, NH – 603 Media Group is proud to announce that we will be leading the Manchester, New Hampshire, group of photographers out into the field for Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photo Walk 2014 on October 11th. Registration is FREE and open to photographers of ALL skill levels. Sign up, today!

We will start our walk in Arms Park and make our way into the city grabbing photos of landmarks and many hidden gems along the way. I know the city quite well and have done photo walks around it in the past but I also welcome participants to present ideas and possible routes in advance so that we can have the best experience possible.

Also, although I have planned this initially as an evening walk in order to best capture the lights and vibrant nightlife of the city, I am open to a change in the time if enough participants require such. Let’s have that discussion if needed….

Thanks for your interest and your participation and I look forward to meeting my fellow photographers in and around the greater Manchester region!


About the Author: is the Senior Marketing Strategist for 603 Media Group. Primarily tasked with the challenges of keeping our small business running, Jeremy also occasionally branches out into public speaking, blogging, website design and raising his son to not be another one of “those damn kids”.

Processing for Commercial Photography

Hiya’, folks! In today’s video, we cover some pretty easy methods for turning a bland photograph into something that really pops. Sometimes, the weather just refuses to take into consideration the fact that you have a big shoot scheduled. That beautiful sky and lighting that you were hoping to capture are as nonexistent as a teetotaler at Mardi Gras. But, if you can’t re-schedule your shoot, there are at least some skills you can bring into play to make your photographs look their best. The techniques covered in this video include:

1. Boosting tone and color ranges through selective use of Topaz Adjust plugin;
2. Working with layers and layer masks;
3. Sky replacement;
4. Adding headlights and marker lights to vehicles, and;
5. Adding lens flares for dramatic effect.

We hope you enjoy this video and learn a few tricks to help you improve your skills. Thanks for watching, from all of us at 603 Media Group and 603 Shoots!